Home School Days.

Special Days for Home Schoolers

If you are a home schooler and would like to visit the Abrams Planetarium, here are some dates and times we've scheduled for you to visit. Of course you can still call and reserve any other show times, but these special homeschool dates are open to anyone. No reservation needed and no minimum group size charge.

We've set aside the first Wednesday of the month for the 2019/2020 school year. (Please note that we have switched from the first Thursday of the month. January and March will be the second Wednesday of the month.) Tickets will be sold at the gift counter starting at 1:00 p.m. Showtimes are at 1:30 p.m. There will be no late seating. Tickets are $2.00 per person.

October 2, 2019

Out There: The Quest for Extrasolar Worlds shows how our perception of our place in the Universe has changed and how the discoveries of exoplanets we made in the last decades even surpassed the dreams of science fiction authors.
Grades 6 and Up

November 6, 2019

Discover our solar system through a new set of eyes-a family from another star system seeking the perfect vacation spot. Fly over the surface of Pluto, our best known Dwarf Planet. Dive down the ice cliffs of Miranda. Sail through the rings of Saturn. Feel the lightning storms at Jupiter. And walk on the surface of Mars. Which destination would you choose?
Grades 1-5


Instructional Materials

December 4, 2019

Learn how the telescope has helped us understand our place in space and continue to expand our understanding of the Universe. Explore the history of the telescope and the discoveries these wonderful tools have made. See how telescopes work and how the largest observatories in the world use them. View the Galilean Moons, Saturn's rings, and spiral structure of galaxies. Learn about the discoveries of Galileo, Huygens, Newton, Hubble, and others.
Grades 5 and Up

Instructional Materials

January 8, 2020

The Sun has shone on our world for four and a half billion years. The light that warms our skin today has been felt by every person who has ever lived. It is our nearest star and our planet's powerhouse, the source of the energy that drives our winds, our weather and all life. The passage of the Sun's fiery disc across the sky - day by day, month by month - was the only way to keep track of time for countless past civilizations. Discover the secrets of our star in this planetarium show and experience never-before-seen images of the Sun's violent surface in immersive fulldome format.
Grades 6 and Up

February 5, 2020

Join us as we showcase an exciting exploration of dark matter, from the Big Bang to its anticipated discovery at the Large Hadron Collider. See the first hints of its existence through the eyes of Fritz Zwicky, the scientist who coined the term "dark matter." From there explore the astral choreography witnessed by Vera Rubin in the Andromeda Galaxy and then plummet deep underground to see the most sensitive dark matter detector on Earth, housed in a former gold mine. Finally journey across space and time to the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, to learn how scientists around the world are collaborating to track down the constituents of dark matter.
Grades 8 and Up

March 11, 2020

The stalwart heroes of The Zula Patrol are on an expedition collecting samples of weather for scientist Multo's research. When the Zula gang inadvertently hurts their loyal pet Gorga's feelings, he decides to leave Zula and find another planet to live on. Villain Dark Truder then tricks Gorga into helping with his latest nefarious scheme to rule the universe. The Zula Patrollers find out and go after him-in the process learning all about weather, both terrestrial and interplanetary. Based on the hit TV series.
Grades Pre-3

Instructional Materials

April 1, 2020

The beauty of a starlit sky conceals the violent forces at work within our universe. From the upheaval of a giant star that explodes to release its material into space, to a future encounter between the Earth and a large asteroid that is too close for comfort, we will witness the forces that hold the universe together and occasionally try to rip it apart. Narrated by Patrick Stewart of Star Trek: The Next Generation and the X-Men films.
Grades 6 and Up

May 6, 2020

The story about an average yellow star on a search for planets of his own to warm and protect. Along his way, he encounters other stars, learns what makes each star special, and discovers that stars can combine to form clusters and galaxies. Eventually, Little Star finds his planets, and each is introduced to audiences along with basic information about the Solar System.
Grades 2-5

Instructional Materials

June 3, 2020

Were the Apollo visits to the Moon actually a hoax? Have aliens landed on Earth? Can you tell your future by the stars? Prepare to debunk and tackle pseduoscience head-on with this planetarium show. Based on the popular book and website of the same name, this show offers a unique and fun approach to learning about the cosmos. Join the "Bad Astronomer" Phil Plait as he takes a critical look at popular myths and misconceptions to show audiences how science can be used to evaluate questionable claims.
Grades 6 and Up

Instructional Materials


Parking

Parking can be difficult on the MSU campus on weekdays. There are metered spaces in the parking ramp behind the planetarium, but they tend to fill up early. There is no parking in the lot in front of the planetarium. That lot is for faculty and staff only. We have 6 spaces by the curb in front of the planetarium. We will give passes for those spaces on a first come basis. Click here for more parking information: DPPS parking information.


Adult Supervision

This is not a drop-off program. All students must be accompanied by an adult and supervised at all times. Parents and chaperones also must buy a ticket for $2.00. Children under two years of age will be admitted at no cost, but we strongly suggest children under two years of age stay home. If a child becomes noisy and disruptive, we may ask that you leave the planetarium theater.


Recommended Ages

The recommended grades given for the above shows are our recommendations based on the show's content. However, students of all ages will be permitted to any of the shows.


Click here for information about the MSU observatory public observing dates. The MSU observatory houses a 24" telescope used for astronomical research. One weekend a month, the telescope is set up for use by the public. Smaller telescopes are set up in the parking lot in front of the observatory. The telescopes will be looking at the Moon, planets and other celestial sights. The dates are typically the weekend closest to the First Quarter Moon

Click here for information about the MSU Astronomy Department lecture series. Once a month, an Astronomy Department faculty member gives a public talk about their current research. The lectures are geared towards general audiences. The lectures are free. Talks start at 7:30 p.m. and usually last about an hour.