Home School Days.

Special Days for Home Schoolers

If you are a home schooler and would like to visit the Abrams Planetarium, here are some dates and times we've scheduled for you to visit. Of course you can still call and reserve any other show times, but these special homeschool dates are open to anyone. No reservation needed and no minimum group size charge.

We've set aside the first Wednesday of the month for the 2021/2022 school year.Tickets will be sold at the gift counter starting at 1:00 p.m. Showtimes are at 1:30 p.m. There will be no late seating. Tickets are $3.00 per person.

October 6, 2021

It takes many people with diverse backgrounds, talents, and skills to run a world-class observatory. Meet a few of these people as they share the wonder of the sky--and the excitement of discovery. Explore the world-class observatories nestled in northern Chile’s mountains and learn why Chile, is an ideal environment for studying the cosmos.
Grades 5 and Up


Instructional Materials
Show Trailer

November 3, 2021

What are we made of? Where did it all come from? Explore the secrets of our cosmic chemistry, and our explosive origins. Connect life on Earth to the evolution of the Universe by following the formation of Hydrogen atoms to the synthesis of Carbon, and the molecules for life. Narrated by Andy Serkis.
Grades 4 and Up


Instructional Materials
Shiow Trailer

December 1, 2021

Explore how the Moon has inspired human creativity, learning, and exploration ever since we have looked to the sky. Each discovery has brought new opportunities to contemplate and imagine, until, driven by dreams, we left Earth and went there in the amazing journeys that culminated in astronauts walking on the Moon. People have imagined the Moon as a glowing disk in the sky, a destination in space, and a world that shares its origin with the Earth. The power of human imagination continues to inspire our relationship with the Moon as our partner in space and companion in our sky.
Grades 5 and Up

Show Trailer

January 5, 2022

The story about an average yellow star on a search for planets of his own to warm and protect. Along his way, he encounters other stars, learns what makes each star special, and discovers that stars can combine to form clusters and galaxies. Eventually, Little Star finds his planets, and each is introduced to audiences along with basic information about the Solar System.
Grades 2-5

Instructional Materials
Show Trailer

February 2, 2022

For thousands of years, Africans have used their knowledge of the sky to build their societies, shape their spiritual lives, and meet their physical needs for survival. Skywatchers of Africa highlights the diversity of African astronomy, examines cultural uses of the sky that developed throughout history, and celebrates our shared human experience.
Grades 5 and Up

March 2, 2022

Learn how the telescope has helped us understand our place in space and continue to expand our understanding of the Universe. Explore the history of the telescope and the discoveries these wonderful tools have made. See how telescopes work and how the largest observatories in the world use them. View the Galilean Moons, Saturn's rings, and spiral structure of galaxies. Learn about the discoveries of Galileo, Huygens, Newton, Hubble, and others.
Grades 5 and Up

Instructional Materials
Show Trailer

April 6, 2022

The Sun has shone on our world for four and a half billion years. The light that warms our skin today has been felt by every person who has ever lived. It is our nearest star and our planet's powerhouse, the source of the energy that drives our winds, our weather and all life. The passage of the Sun's fiery disc across the sky - day by day, month by month - was the only way to keep track of time for countless past civilizations. Discover the secrets of our star in this planetarium show and experience never-before-seen images of the Sun's violent surface in immersive fulldome format.
Grades 6 and Up

Show Trailer

May 4, 2022

While solving a crossword puzzle about the sky, Scarlet Macaw and her friends explore the cause of day and night, the importance of our star the Sun, the beauty of the constellations, and the variety of objects that make up the Universe.
Grades Pre-2

June 1, 2022

Created and hosted by cosmically curious teenagers from Milwaukee schools, this unique cosmic experience takes you on a dynamic journey across the universe and through time. Science Topics Include: Black Holes, Cosmology--Origins & Fate of the Universe, Star Cycles, Sun, Earth Orgins & History, Water Origins & Chemistry.
Grades 6 and Up


Parking

Parking can be difficult on the MSU campus on weekdays. There are metered spaces in the parking ramp behind the planetarium, but they tend to fill up early. There is no parking in the lot in front of the planetarium. That lot is for faculty and staff only. We have 6 spaces by the curb in front of the planetarium. We will give passes for those spaces on a first come basis. Click here for more parking information: DPPS parking information.


Adult Supervision

This is not a drop-off program. All students must be accompanied by an adult and supervised at all times. Parents and chaperones also must buy a ticket for $3.00. Children under two years of age will be admitted at no cost, but we strongly suggest children under two years of age stay home. If a child becomes noisy and disruptive, we may ask that you leave the planetarium theater.


Recommended Ages

The recommended grades given for the above shows are our recommendations based on the show's content. However, students of all ages will be permitted to any of the shows.


Click here for information about the MSU observatory public observing dates. The MSU observatory houses a 24" telescope used for astronomical research. One weekend a month, the telescope is set up for use by the public. Smaller telescopes are set up in the parking lot in front of the observatory. The telescopes will be looking at the Moon, planets and other celestial sights. The dates are typically the weekend closest to the First Quarter Moon

Click here for information about the MSU Astronomy Department lecture series. Once a month, an Astronomy Department faculty member gives a public talk about their current research. The lectures are geared towards general audiences. The lectures are free. Talks start at 7:30 p.m. and usually last about an hour.